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investments. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. and as those things change, fidelity can help you readjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are today, a fidelity ira has a wide range of investment choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. offering specialized solutions in the capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america. i am cathy kay. oscar pistorious is not the only one on trial for a killing. the lead detective is facing charges of attempted murder. a car bomb explodes in damascus. aind in the deep, we join an expedition hunting for species we may never have seen before. ♪ >> welcome to our viewers on public television and in america. faces chargesuus of killing his g
to come, trying to get the japanese economy back into high gear. work the financial formula for others, too? has erupted in france after an american businessman launched an attack on the country's work ethic. on this political firestorm. >> american plane talking does not get much clearer. wantasked what he did not to take over the local beer factory, he gave this straight. >> the french work force only works three hours for higher wages, with one of our breaks and they talked for three hours, and later, he is going to buy chinese entire company to pay less than one the euro per tiresto switch all of the of france needs. the staff was annoyed. >> these people should be affected, -- should be -- they come in every day at 4:00 in the morning. >> even more annoyed was the person who received the letter, the french economic director. he wrote, you show your ignorance to the country, talking about the 40,000 public companies working on this soil. all of these businesses appreciate the quality of the french workers. this upset about the caricature of french tokers, but the offer payless is i
on the local economy. positive effects in terms of lower training costs and turnover and less lost time at work and dedicated employees, so small businesses, mid size and large businesses benefit from in, as well as local government because they don't have as many people relying on social services. so, the data doesn't back that up. in fact, it's a positive thing he when we do it in a planful fashion to raise the minimum wage. >> on this issue, just like an economist. on the one hand, on the other hand, there are studies on both sides. but jonas there is an argument that higher minimum wages reducing turnover, which lessens the costs of employers and could incase employments. >> you would never leave the job if you could get it, it's a pretty good wage. negatives and benefits. both sides of kind of right. if the minimum wage is low $2, it wouldn't disrupt the job market. if it's $50, high unemployment, but a-- there's obviously a level between there where the negatives would exceed the positives. there are positives, workers would get more money under the plan and not outsourced to china. you n
has dogged our economy or the last few years, is that no one wants us to go back to 110% mortgages that we had during the boom times, but weo need to make available to young people the chance that both earning decent salary to be able to buy a case of flood or a decent house th a mortgage that doesn't require a massive deposit. that hasn't been possible for people in recent years and i ink the bank of england move on funding for landings scheme from 80 billion pounds is now going through to the mortgage market and making available lower mortgages at a decent a long-term rate. and that's great. >> thank you, sir. [shouting] [laughter] >> further to the exchange to the leader of the opposition earlier, can ask the prime minister if he will tell the house whether he will personally benefit from the millionaires tax cut, to be introduced in april? >> i will pay all the taxes that are due in the proper way. but the point i would make to him -- [shouting] the point i would make to him is that all the years he sat on this side of the house there was a top rated tax that was lower than the
. they are studying the evolution of specialization as they uncover details of ancient economies around the world. in the maya city of copan, a jeweler fashioned rare shell and jade for his powerful lord. in mexico, living artisans echo the economy of a vanished civilization. and in teotihuacan, evidence of mass production has now been unearthed. tiny faces of clay reflect the men and women who made them a thousand years ago. on the other side of the world, in the ancient roman city of ostia, huge merchant ships were part of an economy much like our own. and today, the tanners of morocco still practice their ancient craft, living proof that economies have evolved out of the past. everyone who has ever lived has been part of an economic system. iel bote grande...mil pesos! economic systems are simply the ways people produce, distribute and consume things -- everything and anything, from tortillas to stocks and bonds. for 10,000, 10,000 an eighth. today, as in the past, economic systems lie at the heart of how a society is organized. archaeologists search for these systems because they believe econ
to be here today and discuss with you cbo's outlook for the budget and economy for the next 10 years. are analyzing shows that the country continues to debate a very large economic challenges. i will discuss the economy first and then i will turn to the budget. we anticipate economic growth will remain slow this year because of the gradual improvement in underlying economic factors will be offset. the good news is that the effects of the financial and housing prices appear to be gradually fading. we expected a upswing in housing construction and increasing availability of credit will help spur a virtual cycle of income, consumer spending, and business investment over the next few years. however several policies that will help bring down the budget deficit will result in a drag in economic activity. the increase in tax rates and the cuts in federal spending scheduled to take effect next month will mean reduced spending by both households and the government. we project an inflation adjusted gdp will increase by about 1.5% in 2013. it would increase roughly 1.5 percentage point faster w
making to the bowel and this is all going to put more sales in the regional economy and again there is so much business activity. and we are blessed with just being in this part of the country and the world. i'm very interested in what we are going to hear from our speakers this morning to sort off guide us through this year. now before we get to our program please join me in thanking the organizations and people who made this possible. and you can clap now for awful them but -- this event is jointly presented by san francisco business times and our partner, title sponsor corn irand carey commercial new mark, night, frank. and we are going it hear from dan clef man and dan class man some 14 year ago really came up with this idea, we sat down over lunch and there was another person involved allen cline knelt and which came up with this idea and so i have to give dan much much credit for that. (applause). . very much so. and in 2012, cornish and carey, dominated the area of commercial real estate with over $6 billion in leasing and sales transactions so very good there. and you are soon
spending control. it's by creating jobs, growing the economy, and expanding the tax base. >> president obama will continue to take his message on the road next week with a stop at a virginia ship building operation. virginia with the massive spending would be hit by the cuts. >> molly, good to see you, kelly? >> jamie, as washington braces for billions in budget cuts, oklahoma senator tom coburn is calling on president obama to stop a 100 city campaign style tour, and angela mcglowan is a fox news political analyst, mark hanna, an adjunct professor at media of new schools and former aide, mark and angela, thank you for joining us, as you both know, senator tom coburn of oklahoma sent a letter to the white house, in it, if washington is truly cutting spending on missions many consider vital, how can we at the same time promise and promote more financial adistance, much less afford this mammoth, 100 city cross country tour, wrote coburn, and while he talked about that, while it's well intentioned, he's urging the president to cancel this tour. mark, what do you think about that? >> kelly
and the state of the two biggest economies in the world. first up, on tuesday in the state of the union, president obama challenged congress to vote on proposals to get weapons of war off our streets. but will it happen? can it happen? we'll talk to a world leader who made it happen in his nation. >>> then, larry summers on how to create jobs in america. the former treasury secretary on how the president can achieve the goals he laid out for the economy. >>> then, many worry that the world's second largest economy is headed for a crash. a rare inside look at the inner workings of the chinese economy. what's really happening there? >>> also, what in the world will get north korea to end its nuclear ambitions? i'll give you my plan. but, first, here's my take. president obama's state of the union address presented an expanded vision of smart government to create jobs and revive the economy. it had many important ideas in it. yet, he lowered his sights on the single policy that would both jump start the economy in the short term and create the conditions for long-term growth. infrastructur
cuts. does the economy have enough kick in it to withstand the sequester? and a big win for activist investor david einhorn in his fight to get apple to share the wealth, with its shareholders. that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! if you get a paycheck, no doubt you have seen it shrink this year. higher payroll taxes have taken 2% out of working americans take home pay. at the same time, gasoline prices have been rising and fast. together, this cuts into the spending power of consumers, and that's bad news for a host of companies, from restaurants to retailers. erika miller reports on how some of these firms are trying to fight back against the pay pinch. >> reporter: virtually every worker in america is taking home 2% less in pay this year because of higher payroll taxes. that's not just bad for consumers, it's also bad for businesses. three out of four households are cutting spending to cope with lower pay. for one out of three households, it means eating out less. consumers are also changing where they dine. >> we are moving from casual dining, down to fast casual, down to the fast
to reform the economy and government spending soon, the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries do today. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you john for your very kind introduction and the invitation to speak at the heritage foundation today. it's a great privilege to be here. i have always been a great admirer of heritage and the council and in many cases the friendship of many people here at heritage for a very long time i have also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which i think is the intention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people believe ideas, habits and expectations in the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy is at the heart of my book, "becoming europe" because at one level becoming europe is certainly about what has happened in europe and why it is now regarded as the sick man of the global economy. my book is also a
of the economy, just not in one year. if you look at the nonpartisan shops who have looked at the impact on the economy, they all coalesce around one number. they say this sequestration if it takes effect and holds will take about .5% of gdp growth out of the 2013 economy. now, that doesn't sound very good to me. we were just talking about how the economy's already growing too slow as far as we're concerned. i don't believe the fourth quarter recessionary number. i think that's going to be revised up. but if you think this is an economy that can take a 50-basis point whack to gdp growth, perhaps we're in a different world. >> here's the thing, let's go through this. 44 billion is the real number and it's funny, i found this today courtesy of my friend. what is that? $44 billion of spending cuts is 2 1/4 of 1% of gdp. so these are such tiny -- but the benefits, the benefits of confidence and certainty and free markets, i think vastly overwhelm these keynesian multipliers. >> and there's really no such thing as a keynesian multiplier. i mean -- well, really. >> do we need a stretcher? >> d
more time to gauge shinzo abe's rating policies. s&p says recent policies could reflat japan's economy. but the government's books will continue to be weighed down by heavy debt. that's even if plans go ahead to raise a sales tax. there's a one in three chance of a downgrade this fiscal year. this is as the japanese prime minister shinzo abe says he will consider changing the bank's mandate. he didn't comment on current policy. all this as investors determine who will become the bank of japan's next governor. front runners for the post include former bank of japan deputy governor and the head of the asian development bank harikahiko tura. >> we did catch up with taro at a meeting this weekend in moscow. the next boj governor was covered, but the first question, whether mr. aso thought the g-20 communique was an endorsement of japan's domestic stimulus plan. >> japan has repeatedly tried to explain that japanese policies are taken to overcome deflation and by all means, these are measures to overcome deflation as well as the recession. that's what is being said in the second paragraph o
back spending. prices at the pump are up nearly $0.50 in a month. >> we are a driving economy. most people drive to their place of work. and so they've got sort of a secondary tax, in addition to the payroll tax increase that they've experienced as well. >> reporter: wal-mart is adjusting by stocking its shelves with lower-priced items, and smaller sized packages. retailers fear the pressure on consumers could get worse if a trillion dollars in across-the- board government spending cuts hit march first. that would be right at the start of the spring selling season. >> i think we will see promotional activity and markdowns become more commonplace. i think the key takeaway here is that we could be looking at a very difficult time for retailers to be raising profitability and expanding margins in this environment. but even in a tough environment there will be some winners. in the retail and restaurant categories, hottovy sees two firms that could thrive: >> our top picks are costco and amazon. we think that they will be key beneficiaries of either a trade out or a trade down among cons
are cutting jobs, millions of jobs around a country and you are damaging the economy. so, stupid as bob said is a good word for it. it is taking a hatchet to the economy, the moment when the economic recovery, no matter if you are republican or democrat, by everybody's estimates is in a fragile state and doesn't make sense and now, the president says, you know, look back to the negotiations he was having with speaker boehner and he said a lot of those proposals are still on the table, we can get back -- we have a three month delay an kick the can down the road a little farther and avoid -- >> two month delay. >> that is the way we apparently govern now in washington, from one crisis to another and the question is when you bump up against it and come up against the debt ceiling and the fiscal cliff usually we put it off but this is one i think that will cause tremendous damage and the -- >> $85 billion. >> with the congress gone for a week when do they have time to negotiate. >> $85 billion in a $3.5 trillion budget. >> and -- >> it will hurt the economy. >> if you lose your job i think it hu
the economy comes to life. norfolk southern. one line, infinite possibilities. then you're going to love this. right now they're only $14.95! wow-a grt deal just got a whole lot better. hurry. $14.95 won't last. >>> the united kingdom is in disarray after horse meat was found in products intended for humans. dinners supplied to schools in northern england included. officials have raided five meat plants and arrested three workers so far. as many as 10,000 products still need to be tested. >>> back in the u.s., the obama administration says as of today they won't take any more applications for the pre-existing condition insurance plan because of limited funding. it's a stop gap program to help people with medical problems who cannot get private insurance right now. new legal provisions kick in january 1st of next year, barring insurers for turning anyone away for poor health. >>> thanks for watching this morning. i'll see you back here at the top of the hour. "your bottom line" starts right now. >>> thank you, susan and victor. we'll see you at the top of the hour. we know what we
the economy, by buying government bonds. >> susie: i'm susie gharib. can two weaklings become strong by teaming up. that's what office depot and office max are hoping for, as they decide to merge. >> tom: and a mixed picture on housing, contractors break ground on more single family homes, but pull back on building apartments and condos. >> susie: that and more tonight on "n.b.r."! how much longer should the federal reserve continue to stimulate the economy? that question was intensely debated at the central bank's policy meeting in january according to the minutes released today. stocks sold off on that news, as investors worry the fed might taper off its stimulus program, sooner than expected, and before its goal of seeing a big pick up in the job market. the fed has been buying $85 billion of mortgage backed securities and treasuries every month to pump up the economy. here's what those fed minutes revealed: "many" policymakers voiced concerns about "potential costs and risks" from more bond buying. others said that the easy-money policies might encourage "excessive risk-taking" a
drones flying over the united states. higher gasoline prices, higher taxes, weakening the economy and taxes, weakening the economy and harris on what the future holds. at a dry cleaner, taxes, weakening the economy and harris on what the future holds. we replaced people with a machine. what? customers didn't like it. so why do banks do it? hello? hello?! if your bank doesn't let you talk to a real person 24/7, you need an ally. hello? ally bank. your money needs an ally. we all work remotely so this is a big deal, our first full team gathering! i wanted to call on a few people. ashley, ashley marshall... here. since we're often all on the move, ashley suggested we use fedex office to hold packages for us. great job. [ applause ] thank you. and on a protocol note, i'd like to talk to tim hill about his tendency to u all caps in emails. [ shouting ] oh i'm sorry guys. ah sometimes the caps lock gets stuck on my keyboard. hey do you wanna get a drink later? [ male announcer ] hold packages at any fedex office location. hey do you wanna get a drink later? progressive direct and other
, because a growing economy and the accompanying revenue will be enough to both pay the bills and create a stronger kentucky. my friends, with all due respect, that is simply not reality -- and the math shows it. yes, the economy and our revenues are projected to grow, but not fast enough to even keep up with expenses, much less to address fundamental weaknesses. secretary of the cabinet mary lassiter, who has been putting together state budgets for 15 years, testified in great detail yesterday before a joint meeting of the appropriations and revenue committees. she showed with overwhelming evidence how anticipated growth will be more than eaten up by decisions you and i made in previous sessions. assuming we hit the consensus forecasting group's out-year prediction of about 3 percent growth -- and yes, that's an assumption -- any new revenue will have to be used to cover things like structural imbalances, obligations to health care and pensions, inflationary growth in medicaid, and health insurance for teachers and state employees. the projected growth in revenues -- and more -- is alre
what we've recovered from. the minimum wage economy, is that what we're recovering to? good morning, i'm christine romans. 28 months in a row, 6.1 million jobs created in the past three years, but the jobs we're adding are not the same quality as the jobs we lost. survey from rutgers university finds 60% of people who found work in six months settled for lower pay. these aren't jobs you can send a kid to college on or buy a house. president obama detailed his blueprint for boosting the middle class. the only new proposal was an old one, raising the minimum wage. >> let's declare that in the wealthiest nation on earth, no one who works full time should have to live in poverty and raise the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour. >> free action was swift and fierce. conservatives say, hey, that's a jobs killer. progressives say it lifts families out of poverty. the problem, you can't find studies to support just about any position. a study found the new minimum wage actually means fewer jobs for low-skilled workers but a study by alan krueger concludes minl mihm wage hikes dewpoint reduce em
. up next, samuel graveyard use of our elected leaders of find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries to. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for your introduction. it's a great privilege to be here. inviting the it council, in many cases the of many people here and heritage for very long time. and also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which, i think, is the attention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people of beliefs, ideas, habits, expectations, and the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. >> on this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy, the heart of my book, becoming europe. because the -- becoming europe is certainly about what has happened to your and why it is now regarded as the sick man of the global economy. but my book is also about how some of these cultural and economic trends
to the economy. >> is this short -- >> it will ultimately work out if the economy can get by with the back to normal payroll tax. this could juice it back around. there's no perfect plan the government can do, but it's possible this payroll tax cut could be lowered in the recession and raisedded in boom times to make up for the cut. lou: good evening, evrybody the day can be described as quiet from washington to the middle east, where as two days for market selloffs brought i told you sos from some wall street gurus. today's triple digit rally in the dow was unobserved by those who lost the narrative. as surrogates and private campaign force, organizing for action, worked to upend the second amendment, the president, himself, seems most willing to put a electoral risk, and the democratic senators and they had the elections, and facing constituents on gun control, trying to explain the president's early enthusiasms and why he's silent about it now. the president privately meeting with white house reporters today who took with it, pins, cameras, or anything with which to record the president
. captioned by the national captioning institute --www.ncicap.org-- >> the president says the economy is improving, but we have to do better. he says republicans don't have a clue, and that austerity is not the answer. he says it is time to educate our children and rebuild our infrastructure. the president's fourth state of the union. how do we pay the bill? >> nothing i am proposing tonight should increase our deficit by a single dime. >> the president offered more of the same -- higher taxes and more stimulus spending. >> the president wants congress to come up with $40 billion to improve infrastructure, wants to raise the minimum wage to $9 an hour, wants a new energy bill similar to cap-and-trade, wants preschool for every 4-year-old in the nation, tax reform, gun control, citizenship for undocumented immigrants. what are his chances, charles? >> approximately zero. he is talking as if we have a huge surplus so we can start spending all over again inaugural address was the philosophical statement of what i call this left-liberalism, the state of the union address is the programmat
where the increase in the minimum wage has stymied the economy, caused jobs to be lost, caused employers not to hire. where is the evidence of that? >> if that is the case, let's make it $20, $50. we not only have chronic unemployment of 8%, we have huge and terribly destructive teenage unemployment, minority unemployment. this is the entry-level jobs where you get started. if you are going to price it out of the market in an economy that has the weakest recovery since the second world war, you are guaranteeing you will create blight for these people. >> those other people who do the jobs that none of us want to do. i think the odds are that he will not get it and he will not fight for it that hard. the last person who fought for a minimum-wage increase was ted kennedy and he actually got it. >> who will be the time kennedy in the senate is an interesting question, too. >> if you cannot pay someone $9 an hour, you probably should not be a business. >> i agree with him -- >> you talk about the economy as if it is a moral and estimate. even if i agree with you, it does not change the fact
. and fidelity investments. >> your personal economy is made up of the things that matter most, including your career. as those things change, fidelity can help you adjust your retirement plan, rethink how you are invested, and refocus as your career moves forward. wherever you are, a fidelity ira has a wide array of choices that can fit your personal economy. fidelity investments, turn here. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to know your business. butoffering specialized solutions in the capital to help you meet your growth objectives. we offer expertise and tailored solutions for small businesses and major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> hello, your watching "gmt," on bbc world news." the south african athlete is formally charged with murdering his girlfriend. his lawyers have applied for bail. the prosecution accused him of premeditated murder. the defense says the shooting was accidental. his girlfriend's funeral took place today. a secret community behind the series of hacking attacks on u.s. infrastructure according to an america
and his team realized that they can't get to their spending nirvana without getting this economy growing. and the economy is hobbling along, even if slow runners can across the finish line. neil: we may be back to levels of the market where we were five years ago. but it has been a steady climb back to worst -- excuse me, from e worse. net net, is a good barack obama? >> yes, i am for it. we are all investors. we all want to see this thing improve. i agree with bob that economics is about choices. neil: i do buy your argument about the slowly inching back economy here. not in the gangbuster fashion, but enough to compel money that has been nervous. and sitting on the sidelines come back in. but the way it is being committed is not to expand plans and operations as much as it is to retrench buying out a competitor. you're really not expanding your business but you're really just retention the existing business. you are not heralding the success of what is going on. you could argue it is part of the bunker mentality. explain the mechanics of what is happening. >> i think you're absolutely
if sequestration happens? do you think the economy slows down? >> well, it will slow -- by all estimates, it will slow the economy down somewhat. there are differences among economists as to how much. but it will, of course, be contractionary and therefore it will slow growth, but there are a number of other things that are going on in economy that are pro-growth, so it will have a negative impact but there are other pro-growth elements which can be very helpful. >> it sounds like you're not that worried. >> i am worried because it does cause concern that we can't agree on the kinds of rational policies to deal with our problems and we have to revert to something that no one really wants, but they can't reach an agreement on something positive to avoid this kind of thing. >> the good news is that this economy is growing, the u.s. economy. >> i think the u.s. economy is recovering. the job is recovering. the energy boom is helpful. the housing market has bottomed out and beginning to pick up. balance sheets, consumer balance sheetsz, business balance sheets are doing well and exports are
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 1,587 (some duplicates have been removed)